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Stevia 90% P.E., 90% Steviosides - 7060

Stevia 90% P.E., 90% Steviosides - 7060 Image
Product Code : 7060
Regular name : Stevia
Common name : Stevia
Latin name : Stevia rebaudiana Download Spec-sheet
 

Description

Stevia rebaudiana is an herb in the Chrysanthemum family, which grows wild as a small shrub in parts of Paraguay and Brazil. The glycosides in its leaves, including steviosides, account for its incredible sweetness. The refined extracts of stevia, a white powder with 85%-95% steviosides, claims to be 200-300 times sweeter than table sugar. Stevia has no calories and does not raise blood sugar levels. The U.S. FDA’s position on stevia is somewhat ambiguous. In 1991, citing a preliminary mutagenicity study, the FDA issued an import alert that effectively blocked the importation and sale of stevia in this country. Ironically, this was the year that a follow-up study found flaws in the first study and seriously questioned its results. In September 1995, the FDA revised its import alert to allow stevia and its extracts to be imported as a food supplement but not as a sweetener. Yet, it defines stevia as an unapproved food additive, not affirmed as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) in the United States.
 

Nutriceutical Properties

Per above information, no claims can be made.

Stevia 90% P.E., 90% Steviosides - 7060

Stevia 90% P.E., 90% Steviosides - 7060 Image
Product Code : 7060
Regular name : Stevia
Common name : Stevia
Latin name : Stevia rebaudiana Download Spec-sheet
 

Description

Stevia rebaudiana is an herb in the Chrysanthemum family, which grows wild as a small shrub in parts of Paraguay and Brazil. The glycosides in its leaves, including steviosides, account for its incredible sweetness. The refined extracts of stevia, a white powder with 85%-95% steviosides, claims to be 200-300 times sweeter than table sugar. Stevia has no calories and does not raise blood sugar levels. The U.S. FDA’s position on stevia is somewhat ambiguous. In 1991, citing a preliminary mutagenicity study, the FDA issued an import alert that effectively blocked the importation and sale of stevia in this country. Ironically, this was the year that a follow-up study found flaws in the first study and seriously questioned its results. In September 1995, the FDA revised its import alert to allow stevia and its extracts to be imported as a food supplement but not as a sweetener. Yet, it defines stevia as an unapproved food additive, not affirmed as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) in the United States.
 

Nutriceutical Properties

Per above information, no claims can be made.